These are the worst food items for thyroid

  • Jan 30 , 2017

Thyroid disorders are conditions that affect the thyroid gland, a butterfly-shaped gland in the front of the neck. Thyroid has important roles to regulate numerous metabolic processes throughout the body. Different types of thyroid disorders affect either its structure or function.

The thyroid gland is located below Adam's apple wrapped around the trachea (windpipe). A thin area of tissue in the gland's middle, known as the isthmus, joins the two thyroid lobes on each side. The thyroid uses iodine to produce vital hormones. Thyroxine, also known as T4, is the primary hormone produced by the gland. After delivery via the bloodstream to the body's tissues, a small portion of the T4 released from the gland is converted to triodothyronine (T3), which is the most active hormone.

The function of the thyroid gland is regulated by a feedback mechanism involving the brain. When thyroid hormone levels are low, the hypothalamus in the brain produces a hormone known as thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) that causes the pituitary gland (located at the base of the brain) to release thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to release more T4.

Since the thyroid gland is controlled by the pituitary gland and hypothalamus, disorders of these tissues can also affect thyroid function and cause thyroid problems.

So, following are some of the food items you should avoid if you have thyroid:

          
Photo courtesy: Let Me Groom

Cruciferous vegetable - Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage, can interfere with the production of thyroid hormone, particularly people who have an iodine deficiency. Digesting these vegetables can block the thyroid's ability to absorb iodine, which is essential for normal thyroid function. People with hypothyroidism may want to limit their intake of broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, turnips. Cooking the vegetables can reduce the effect that cruciferous vegetables have on the thyroid gland. Limiting your intake is an option.

Soy - The hormone estrogen can interfere with your body's ability to use thyroid hormone. Soy is loaded with plant-based phytoestrogen, and some researchers believe too much soy may increase a person's risk for hypothyroidism. People with hypothyroidism should moderate their intake of soy. However, because soy hasn't been definitively linked to hypothyroidism, there are no specific dietary guidelines.

Gluten - People with hypothyroidism may want to consider minimising their intake of gluten. Gluten can irritate the small intestine and may hamper absorption of thyroid hormone replacement medication. However, if you do choose to eat gluten, be sure to choose whole grains varieties of bread, pasta, and rice, which are high in fibre and other nutrients and can help improve bowel irregularity.

Sugary foods - Hypothyroidism can cause the body's metabolism to slow down. You want to avoid the foods with excess amounts of sugar because it's a lot of calories with no nutrients. It's best to reduce the amount of sugar you eat or try to eliminate it completely from your diet.

Alcohol - Alcohol consumption can wreak havoc on both thyroid hormone levels in the body and the ability of the thyroid to produce the hormone. Alcohol appears to have a toxic effect on the thyroid gland and suppresses the ability of the body to use thyroid hormone. Ideally, people with hypothyroidism should cut out alcohol completely or drink in careful moderation.