Skin disorders faced by older adults

  • Feb 03 , 2017

The marks on your skin appearing with age can be a skin disorder. Here are some of the disorders faced by older adults.

  • Seborrheic Keratosis - A seborrheic keratosis is a type of skin growth. They can be unsightly, but the growths aren’t harmful. However, in some cases, a seborrheic keratosis can be difficult to distinguish from melanoma, a very serious type of skin cancer. The growth has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance.


    Photo Courtesy: healthline.com
     
  • Benign melanocytic nevus - A variety of benign lesions in elderly patients involve proliferation of melanocytes. These lesions include dysplastic nevi, which histologically contain somewhat asymmetric nests of melanocytes; compound nevi, which histologically contain more symmetric nests of melanocytes in the dermis and epidermis; and intradermal nevi, which histologically contain nests of melanocytes in the dermis. Melanocytic nevi do not require removal unless a melanoma is suspected.


    Photo Courtesy: onlinedermclinic.com

     
  • Blue nevus - A blue nevus (nevus) is a rather unusual and harmless mole. The blue nevus is a dark blue colour because the pigment cells (melanocytes) are deeper in the skin than in brown moles and freckles. Characteristically, the view seen with dermoscopy is a uniform steel-blue pattern. In principle they are harmless but they can sometimes be mimicked by malignant lesions, i.e. some melanomas can look like a blue nevus.


    Photo Courtesy: huidziekten.nl

     
  • Lentigo - Lentigines—small, well-demarcated tan or brown macules often encircled by sun-damaged skin—can also appear on the normal skin. These macules, which become more numerous with advancing age, usually appear in groups.  Typical histologic findings include thickening of the epidermis and increased pigmentation of the basal layer. Melanocytes may increase in number but they do not form nests. Lentigines may evolve gradually over time or they can erupt suddenly. The pigment ranges from tan to brown to black; it may be homogeneous or variegated.


    Photo Courtesy: huidziekten.nl

     
  • Porokeratosis – Porokeratosis or parakeratosis is a specific disorder of keratinization that is characterised histologically by the presence of a cornoid lamella, a thin column of closely stacked, parakeratotic cells extending through the stratum corneum with a thin or absent granular layer.


    Photo Courtesy: dermaamin.com